E de la Garza Institute for Goat Research Langston University
Workshops & Field Day Newsletter Newsletter Subscription Demonstrations Demonstrations Langston University Research Building
Goat Menu
 

extension
extension
research
other
library
quiz
search
about
contact
faculty

bar

 

Effect of ruminally protected choline on productivity of Angora goats

T. Shenkoru1,2, F.N. Owens2, R. Puchala1, and T. Sahlu1

1E (Kika ) de la Garza Institute for Goat Research, Langston University, Langston, OK, and 2Animal Science Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK

Twenty-five Angora wethers (29 ± 6 kg initial BW and > 1 yr of age) were used to evaluate effects of ruminally protected choline (PC) on BW gain, blood metabolites, and mohair production. Animals were randomly allocated to five treatments and had ad libitum access to 55% concentrate diet (oat-based, 13% CP) for 90 d. Treatments were 1, 2, and 3 g/d of PC, 3 g/d of unprotected choline (UP), and no added choline (control). In situ ruminal disappearance of PC was 7%, whereas disappearance of UP at 2 h was complete. Total tract digestibility of PC was 56%. Dry matter intake and feed efficiency were similar among treatments (P > 0.10). Body weight gain for 3 g PC was greater (P < 0.05) than for the control and UP. No difference in grease fleece weight was observed among treatments. Mohair diameter differed (P < 0.05) between UP and PC and between UP and 3 g PC. Ruminal VFA concentration was higher for 3 vs 1 (P < 0.01) and 2 g PC (P < 0.07). The molar percentage of butyric acid was lowest for 3 g PC (P < 0.05). Plasma protein concentration was higher (P < 0.05) for 2 g PC than for C, UP, and 1 g PC. Plasma cholesterol concentration for the control was lower (P < 0.05) than for 2 and 3 g PC. The level of NEFA in plasma was decreased by PC supplementation (P < 0.05). In conclusion, supplementation of growing Angora wethers with 3 g/d of protected choline increased ADG without change in DMI, but had no effect on mohair growth or quality. Effects of PC on plasma NEFA and cholesterol levels suggest altered lipid metabolism.


 

Extension Activities   |   Research Activities   |   Other Activities
Library Activities   |   Quiz   |   Search   |   About Us   |   Contact Us   |   Faculty & Staff
Research Extension Home   |   Top of Page

Copyright© 2000 Langston University   • Agricultural Research and Extension Programs
P.O. Box 730  • Langston, OK  73050 • Phone 405.466.3836