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Carcass characteristics and composition for Spanish and Boer crossbred goat kids

M. Cameron1, T. Sahlu1, S. Hart1, G. Detweiller1, and S. Coleman2

1E (Kika) de la Garza Institute for Goat Research, Langston University, Langston, OK, and 2USDA/ARS Grazinglands Research Laboratory, El Reno, OK

Eighteen Spanish (S), Boer × Angora (BA), and Boer × Spanish (BS) castrates were used to investigate the effects of genotype on carcass characteristics, body composition, and distribution of carcass tissues. Kids were offered ad libitum a concentrate diet (25% CP, 2.71 Mcal DE/kg, 35% NDF, and 18% ADF). Animals were slaughtered at 212 ± 5 d of age. Carcasses were eviscerated, hung for 72 h at 5oC, weighed, and split. The left half was fabricated into seven primal cuts. The right half and noncarcass components were individually ground and analyzed for DM, ash, CP, and fat. Live body weight (BW), empty BW, hot carcass weight, and dressing percentage were similar (P > 0.05) among genotypes (32.4, 30.1, and 25.4 ± 2.1 kg; 27.5, 27.7, and 23.3 ± 3.0 kg; 15.0, 14.1, and 11.9 ± 1.0 kg; and 50.6, 51.2, and 51.6 ± 1.3% of empty BW for BS, BA, and S, respectively). Boer × Spanish had greater (P < .005) bone:lean ratio than either BA or S (0.45, 0.50 and 0.50 ± 0.01, respectively). Genotype had no effect (P > 0.05) on carcass scores, backfat thickness, or longissimus muscle area. Internal fat was not affected by genotype (P > 0.05), averaging 1.94 ± 0.3 kg (7% of empty BW). Chemical composition of the carcass, noncarcass and the empty body were similar among genotypes (57.6 ± 1.5%, 17.6 ± 1.4%, and 20.2 ± 0.5%; 55.6 ± 1.7%, 19.5 ± 1.5%, and 19.0 ± 1.1%; 57.1 ± 1.4%, 16.8 ± 1.1%, and 21.1 ± 0.7% for moisture, fat, and protein, respectively). The proportions of separable lean and fat in the primal breast, rack, loin, shank, and flank were similar (P > 0.05) among genotypes (averaging 42.3 ± 3.2 and 29.0 ± 3.6%; 43.6 ± 2.2 and 14.5 ± 2.0%; 56.2 ± 1.8 and 17.5 ± 1.6%; 64.9 ± 0.9 and 5.5 ± 1.1%; 60.1 ± 4.0 and 39.9 ± 4.0%, respectively). Lean composed a greater (P < 0.05) proportion of the cut in both BS and S than in BA in the primal shoulder(61.6, 63.5, and 58.0 ± 0.9%, respectively). Boer crosses had a lower (P < 0.05) proportion of bone than S in the primal leg (22.5, 23.8, and 26.5 ± .92% for BS, BA, and S, respectively). Genotype had no effect on percentage of lean or fat in the primal leg (averaged 66.9 ± 1.8% and 6.83 ± .97%, respectively). Genotype had little effect on carcass characteristics or body composition in growing kids fed a high concentrate diet. Results indicate that Angora producers can as effectively produce goats with a high quality carcass as Spanish producers when Boer buck are used as a terminal sire breed.


 

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