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Garlic as an anthelmentic for goats

Z. Wang, A. L. Goetsch, S. P. Hart, and T. Sahlu

Journal of Animal Science 87(E-Supplement 2):309. 2009

A previous experiment (J. Anim. Sci. 86 (E-Suppl. 2):292) showed that feeding garlic to Spanish goat wethers infected with Haemonchus contortus reduced fecal egg count (FEC). The present experiment was conducted to determine the anthelmintic effect of garlic in mature does. Twelve Spanish does (7 yr of age; 39 2.2 kg BW) naturally infected with H. contortus were allocated to two treatments (six per treatment) and housed individually for 28 d. Does were fed diets (ME = 8.7 MJ/kg and CP = 10% DM) of coarsely ground grass hay (73%) and concentrate (primarily corn and soybean meal) at a level of intake for BW maintenance without or with 2% garlic powder hand-mixed with concentrate. Fecal samples were collected on d 0, 2, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 21, and 24 and blood was collected on d 0, 14, and 28; d-0 values were used as covariates. Statistical analysis of FEC entailed log transformation. Initial FEC averaged 6,167/g (SEM = 2,319; range = 600 to 13,050) for Control and 13,800/g (SEM = 5,301; range = 2,050 to 8,650) for Garlic. Average daily gain during the experiment was greater (P < 0.02) for Garlic vs. Control (-42 vs. 74 g). Average FEC was decreased (P < 0.02) by garlic supplementation (6,395 vs. 1,290/g), although there was a trend for an interaction between treatment and day (P < 0.06). Effects of garlic on FEC on d 2 and 4 were nonsignificant (P > 0.43), whereas differences occurred on d 8 (5,819 vs. 912/g; P < 0.03), 11 (7,368 vs. 605/g; P < 0.01), 15 (6,114 vs. 658/g; P < 0.01), 18 (5,783 vs. 745/g; P < 0.02), 21 (8,571 vs. 1,777/g; P < 0.07), and 24 (9,362 vs. 1,720/g; P < 0.05). Serum concentrations of IgA, IgM, and IgG and the number of blood eosinophils were not influenced by feeding garlic (P > 0.10). However, the number of white blood cells tended (P < 0.08) to be greater for Garlic than for Control (11,153 vs. 8,783/?L). In conclusion, garlic appears to possess anthelmintic activity against H. contortus via cell mediated immunity, which requires a feeding period of at least 4 d for expression.


 

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